The Not-So-Secret Serum | Dissent Magazine

My latest piece on aid, suspicion and evacuation in a time of Ebola has been posted in Dissent Magazine's blog.

Advertisements

Black Twitter Responds To AP’s Insensitive Renisha McBride Verdict Tweet

Critical media reading by ‘Black Twitter.”

The Urban Daily

ap renisha mcbride

Black Twitter wasn’t happy with how the Associated Press handled the verdict in case of Theodore Wafer, who was convicted of second-degree murder in the shooting death of Renisha McBride.

The tweet in question inexplicably references McBride’s reported inebriation at the time of her murder, with an equally inexplicable mention of Wafer’s home-ownership.

The hashtag that followed “#APHeadlines” took the usually venerable news wire to task through absurdly satirized headlines of old news stories. Check out some of the more poignant examples below.

https://twitter.com/adept2u/status/497466448512438272

https://twitter.com/braun_jm/status/497465729739157505

View original post 353 more words

Gaza and the politics of numbers

How powerful is a number? I’ve been writing about the politics and techniques of enumeration for some time now and continue to delve into how the global health and development industries use numbers to advance and justify their work. I am also interested in how people interpret and use various estimates to communicate value(s) and... Continue Reading →

On bureaucracy

Last week in my anthropology and global social problems class, students learned about bureaucracy and how anthropologists engage with the concept. We read the introduction to Hummel's famous book on The Bureaucratic Experience, which is a pretty good primer on how bureaucracy transforms social action, human relations, and bureaucrats themselves. We started class with this... Continue Reading →

An anthropologist weighs in on the demonization of Chechnya and Chechens after the Boston Marathon bombing

Sarah Kendzior, in a recent opinion piece on Al Jazeera, compares the aftermath of President McKinley's assassination by a Polish-American to that of last week's Boston Marathon bombings. In the piece, she argues that Chechen ethnicity became demonized (and criminalized). She writes: Knowing nothing of the Tsarnaevs' motives, and little about Chechens, the American media tore... Continue Reading →

more on the politics of representation in relation to childhood in Africa.

Africa is a Country (Old Site)

In 1995 Dorling Kinderlsey published a book, Children Just Like Us, sponsored by UNICEF, which brought pictures of children from “all over the world” into its pages, complete with facts and apparently direct quotations from the children (who all seem to speak perfect English). The book feels friendly, ecumenical: children certainly have some funny habits and names, but underneath, of course, they are all alike!  What effects do these kind of books, which make faraway places and different cultures specularly available to middle-class children, have on the young minds who read them. Do they inform a harmlessly cosmopolitan, global outlook? Or ambitions to travel, to see and know the world as benevolently different as it was promised? Is there another perspective hidden within, which involves a dangerous sense of moral and intellectual superiority? The cause of these thoughts are a photo-series of children with their toys, by an Italian…

View original post 957 more words

The conflict in Mali

Yesterday, Max Fisher, foreign affairs blogger at the Washington Post, put together a helpful primer, "9 Questions about Mali You Were Too Embarrassed to Ask." It is funny, accessibly written, and a good start for those unfamiliar with the conflict. But as is the case in most simplified (but not simple) explanations of complex conflicts,... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑